Farm News

Garlicky Fingertips

garlic plants growing

This is the week for garlic planting. At least that is what the calendar states. The saturated soil and pouring skies are singing a different song. So we farmers will acquiesce; it’s one more chance to practice something I call ‘the patient pause.’

The patient pause isn’t a stall out. It’s not a giving up or admission of defeat. Rather, the patient pause is a moment of reassessment. It’s a reminder that when I feel stuck, the stickiness is only a feeling. In actuality, I have a choice. Re-evaluating one’s situation represents a choice with substantial consequences.

The patience part of the pause is critical. Anytime one starts mucking around in self-inquiry, our stuck-in-a-rut ways of doing things can come irascibly roaring to the forefront. With respect to the garlic, it seems stupid to ask, “Why do we bother planting garlic?” But as I patiently wait out the rain, I pause to consider this very question. The patient pause is a chance for me to re-commit myself to the valuable effort, time and investment I am about to make. Is my standard operating procedure still worth it?

dried garlic ready for planting

To plant garlic, one must break apart the bulbs, select the largest cloves, and tuck each individual, correctly oriented, into the cold soil. As we grade for size, our hands probably touch 3,500 cloves of garlic in order to select the 1,600 most valuable for planting. Depending on the variety, the breaking apart of cloves is sometimes easy and sometimes hard. No matter what, it is our hands that carry the heaviest load. Gloves or no gloves, days after garlic planting, my garlicky fingertips will remind me of their industriousness.

How incredible, I think to myself, to have two gracious and strong hands. Year after year, my palms and fingers labor in concert to make new life possible. It is only hands that possess the miraculous, agile strength it takes to separate bulb after bulb, yet be so gentle as to not to bruise or break the tender life inside.

The patient pause re-affirms for me that I am making the right choices with my time and skills. But more often than not, it also drops me down square in the lap of gratitude.

To many outsiders, my profession—in fact my whole ‘simple’ life—seems unduly mundane and restrictive. But the world I choose to inhabit is ultimately a liberating one. I have the responsibility and the pleasure to shape each of my days. I am not cornered into maintaining systems that no longer suit me. I am not saddled with preserving a status quo.

I love my farm. Even when my work is hard to love, I love my work. Despite every rigid requirement weather and soil ask of me, I still carry the gift of choice. In fact, it is the precious why and the gritty how which create the structure of my life. Amidst all the touted busyness of business, I hold most assuredly to the formidable beauty of the patient pause. ~AJ

No Comments Yet


Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *